Types of Skills Dogs Learn

ICAN trains dogs in a variety of skills that assist children, adolescents, and adults who have physical and/or developmental disabilities. Because each disability varies in the types of skills that are needed for that dog to provide service to the client, it is important for us to match the right dog with the right person.

ICAN is also certified by Assistance Dogs International in which we must follow strict guidelines and policies on the training and placement of service dogs.

There are four levels of training – Level 1, 2, 3 and 4. These skills start with the basic commands from sit, down, stay, drop, hug, shake, hurry, dress, stand to front, bed, back, behind, crawl tug, give, get, lap, up, down, etc., to the more advanced skills of turning on and off lights, opening doors/drawers, taking out laundry, alerting to low blood sugar, retrieving items from a cabinet or refrigerator, bracing for support, finding help or interrupting a repetitive motion of a child with autism or the panic attack of a veteran with PTSD.

It takes two years to train a service dog, and by the time an ICAN service dog graduates, he/she will know more than sixty commands.

Check out some photos of ICAN's dogs in action below! (Liz Kaye Photography)

ICAN trains dogs in a variety of skills that assist children, adolescents, and adults who have physical and/or developmental disabilities. Because each disability varies in the types of skills that are needed for that dog to provide service to the client, it is important for us to match the right dog with the right person.

ICAN is also certified by Assistance Dogs International in which we must follow strict guidelines and policies on the training and placement of service dogs.

There are four levels of training - Level 1, 2, 3 and 4. These skills start with the basic commands from sit, down, stay, drop, hug, shake, hurry, dress, stand to front, bed, back, behind, crawl tug, give, get, lap, up, down, etc., to the more advanced skills of turning on and off lights, opening doors/drawers, taking out laundry, alerting to low blood sugar, retrieving items from a cabinet or refrigerator, bracing for support, finding help or interrupting a repetitive motion of a child with autism or the panic attack of a veteran with PTSD.

It takes two years to train a service dog, and by the time an ICAN service dog graduates, he/she will know more than sixty commands.

Check out some photos of ICAN's dogs in action below! (Liz Kaye Photography)